Biodiversity

High hopes held for the survival of the Jardine River turtle

The  Jardine River Turtle (Emydura subglobosa subglobosa) ‘reappeared’ last year in the Northern Peninsula Area (NPA) after almost 20 years in hiding.  First recorded  in the 1970’s, the last scientifically confirmed sighting of the turtle was in 1996.  Continue Reading…

New approach to boost biodiversity in the Condamine

Condamine Alliance has adopted a new way to boost biodiversity in the Condamine catchment and initial results have proved promising.

The group has just released the first year report card in its biodiversity project, Enrich, which is supported through funding from the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future Biodiversity Fund.

The five year project is working in targeted locations across the catchment which have been chosen for their special vegetation characteristics and possibility of maximum conservation gains.  Continue Reading…

Fencing boosts biodiversity for Goondiwindi graziers

Goondiwindi graziers Kim and Judy Felton-Taylor are enjoying increased biodiversity while maintaining production on their cattle property ‘Terella’ after working with QMDC and Landcare to successfully manage 130 hectares of riparian and remnant vegetation.

The couple began working closely with Landcare coordinators and QMDC Technical staff in 2009 and one year later undertook a Regional Incentives Project to enhance biodiversity values on their land.    Continue Reading…

Small wetlands make for big gains

A Mossman landholder plans on keeping sediment and nutrients on his property during the next wet wet season with help from a number of partners. Not only has he constructed a wetland on his property, he also seeks to link important habitat corridors from the hills to the coast.  Continue Reading…

Federally funded project welcomes long-nosed potaroo

Courtesy Andrew Shipway

A federally funded project aimed at conserving and enhancing wildlife habitat across properties in the Kerry Valley is starting to welcome back wildlife, with a nationally threatened long-nosed potaroo spotted on a cattle property last month. Continue Reading…

Woodslake Rehabilitation Project

Woodslake is perhaps the most culturally significant site in the closer Burketown locality. Traditional owners once relied on this pristine freshwater ecosystem as their water, food, cultural and recreational source. Since then pressures and impacts from road construction, pastoralist activities and other forms of infrastructure have created major erosion and sediment control problems in and around the lake. The adverse impact to water quality and general loss of biodiversity over this time, as seen through the eyes of Gangalidda and Garawa Traditional Owners, has been alarming.

Continue Reading…

More than 1.2 million hectares declared Indigenous Protected in North QLD

NQ Dry Tropics is joining Traditional Owners to celebrate the declaration of more than 1.2 million hectares between Mission Beach and Ingham under the Girringun Region Indigenous Protected Areas (GRIPA) Management Plan.

The declaration is the culmination of years of hard work by the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation and will guide Traditional Owners to look after the region’s natural resources and cultural heritage.

Continue Reading…

Normanton Ranger Group watch over and protect significant wetland

The Normanton Ranger Group has, with assistance from a Northern Gulf Resource Management Group Caring for our Country Project, been able to build a seclusion fence around a significant wetland.  A key focus of this and other projects the Normanton Rangers have been working on has been monitoring the effectiveness of these management actions, which the rangers have done using I-Tracker Management and developing their own monitoring methodologies.

Continue Reading…

Protecting biodiversity by improving connectivity

By Samantha Hobbs, South Cape York Catchments

In fragmented landscapes, wildlife corridors that connect healthy ecosystems are necessary to maintain biodiversity. They allow populations to interbreed which improves long-term genetic viability; they provide access to larger habitats which ensures a wider range of food sources and shelter; and they provide an avenue for animals to move or shelter in times of stress, during wild fires and climate change impacts.

Continue Reading…

Improving biodiversity through grazing management in the Southern Gulf region

Southern Gulf Catchments worked with landholders to protect priority habitat areas in the Southern Gulf of Carpentaria catchments, as part of the Back on Track – Actions for Biodiversity project.

Three properties (Barr Creek, Mount Emu, Maiden Springs) received funding to complete four on-ground projects, which assisted in grazing management to protect species and habitat.  The total area of over 17,000 hectares directly benefited from these on-ground works. Each participating property was assisted and encouraged to enter further discussions with the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP) about potential completion of an Nature Refuge Agreement.

Continue Reading…